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This article was written on 01 Nov 2012, and is filled under Cooking.

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Homemade Cock Sauce (AKA Sriracha)

If I had to sum this post up in two words, those words would be “F#@% YES.” I’d have to wholeheartedly agree with that statement, even though the original author of the recipe jokingly redacts it. This is a dream come true for me, as I go through bottles of Sriracha en masse. It is worth noting that this recipe is entirely grass roots, right down to the cultivation of the spicy peppers needed for scorchy-goodness. The recipe was adapted from Joshua Bousel’s on Serious Eats, which was in turn based on the original recipe from The Sriracha Cookbook. (Which is a hands-down, must have for Sriracha lovers, by the way.)

Ingredients (for 1 1/2 cup yield):

  • 1 1/2 lbs of red jalapeños and red serranos, stems snipped off, leaving green tops intact (Adjust the ratio based on how spicy you’d like the final product to be. I did a 1:1 ratio, and it was quite a bit hotter than Huy Fong’s. The more serranos you use, the spicier the sauce will be.)
  • 6 cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 4 tbsp light brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp Kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup of distilled white vinegar

Instructions:

  1. Place peppers, garlic, sugar, and salt in your food processor and pulse until finely chopped. (Alternatively, if you don’t have a food processor, you could finely chop the peppers and garlic by hand, then mix in the sugar and salt.)
  2. Transfer mixture to a clean jar, then cover and let sit at room temperature. (I put the mash in a mason jar with the lid screwed on very loosely. You want to give your mixture a little breathing room, so don’t screw the top on too tight. Alternatively, you could forgo the jar/lid combo and just use a bowl and plastic wrap.) Store in a dark, dry place.
  3. Check the jar every day for fermentation. (This should begin after 2–3 days.) Once you begin to see bubbles/liquid-y magic at the bottom of the jar, fermentation has begun! (For me, this began after 2 days.) Stir contents each day, until the contents of the jar are no longer rising in volume from the fermentation. (My mash hit this point after 3 days.)
  4. Transfer mash to your food processor/blend, add vinegar, and purée until completely smooth. (To get the mixture really smooth, I let my food processor run for about 10 minutes straight.) Pour mixture through a fine mesh sieve into a heavy saucepan, stirring and mashing it through the sieve until you’ve gotten every last bit of spicy goodness through. When you’ve finished, only seed and large chili chunks should remain in the sieve.
  5. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat and let simmer for 5–10 minutes, or until you’ve achieved a desirable consistency. (I let mine go until the sauce began to “spit” a little.) Transfer to a clean, airtight container and store in the refrigerator for up to six months.

Credits:
[1] Recipe & photography by Carey of Reclaiming Provincial.

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